Tag: Scrivener

I love my job but I hate this part

I love my job. Writing stories and articles and study books delights and excites me.

    But…

Don’t you hate when people say something good and then ruin it with a but?

I like your hair, but…it looks like you’re stuck in the 80s
Your dog is so pretty, but…he has no manners at all.

You know what I’m talking about. People do this all the time. WE do this several times during any conversation.
Because the truth of the matter is ugly hard to swallow unimaginable depressing.

Nothing in life is without its flaws and drawbacks.

(Sorry, honey. I know I tell you and everyone else that you’re perfect, but that’s just not the case. You’re perfect in my eyes only…and when you don’t leave the toilet seat up.)

I’m a full-time, professional author. To earn a paycheck, I substitute teach at the local middle and high schools.
I enjoy teaching. I believe it’s one of my secondary strengths (which is why I write Bible study books and teach women and teenagers at my church).

But writing is my soul food.

When I’m in the groove, churning words directly from my heart and mind onto paper (or a computer screen), it’s Heaven-on-Earth.
Why? Because I believe I was created to do this “writing thing.”

What I Love

I love when I get a new idea. It sparkles and gleams. Every cast of light reveals another dimension.

I enjoy sketching out the plot. I do this with a ton of “what if” questions. And I only hammer in the major plot points before I begin to write. I like to give my characters just enough rope to jerk them into an uncomfortable position.

I adore setting up the scenes in Scrivener, color coding them so I can keep track of things like narrator or timeline.

I don’t even fear the blank page.

I crank out the first scene. I don’t sweat it too much. It will get rewritten more than any other scene in the novel. I accept this and pound out the words.


I bite my lip as I write the last scene. Where do I think my characters will end up? How do I end this?
Believe me, I come up with some incredible last lines.

Then they get edited out of the final manuscript.

I write. There’s no fear of blank screens and blinking cursors.

If I’m not “feeling” a scene, I skip to where my characters are begging to go. I can fill in the blanks later. In fact, those blanks might be better scenes if I don’t force them when I’m not emotionally engaged in writing them.

The whole fast draft and first draft process makes me feel euphoric.

Not that I Hate This

Okay, actually, I pretty much despise everything that comes after writing the first draft of a novel.

As for shorter projects, I don’t mind making several editing passes and polishing the manuscript to a shine. I can do it in relatively the same amount of hours I invested in creating the original draft.

Novels? Not so much.

There’s no way to comb through 70,000 plus words in three weeks (the average time it takes me to write that at the rate of 1,000 words per hour).

And every manuscript needs multiple “passes” before it’s ready to be seen by someone I want to buy it.

I think I’ve written about my process before here and here, so I’m not going to bore you with those details again.

The problem is that the words start to all sound the same after my sixth pass through a manuscript. I can’t discern what works and what doesn’t.

I’m done. I hate this stupid thing. Can I throw it away now?

Some writers talk about coming to love their stories the more they work on it. I get there after the publisher’s editor takes a fine tooth comb to it, pointing out all the weak points and helping me strengthen them.

But while I’m working on the pre-published manuscript? I come to despise it.

Sometimes, when I pick it up months later (on a break from my most recent revision nightmare), I decide it’s not such a bad story. That character is pretty witty. That fight scene gives me palpitations.

But when I’m in the middle of trying to polish it, hoping to convince a publisher to take a risk on me?

I get to the point where I can’t stand the sight of it.

Why would anyone want this if you hate it so much?

Who cares? I just want to get it out of my sight.

What things do you love about your job? What makes you groan with dread?

If this post appealed to you, you might like Hero Delivery. It’s a bulletin with deals and specials from Sharon Hughson. It can be on the way to your inbox in a few clicks.

Check out Finding Focus and my other books. You’re sure to find something worth reading.
Already read one or more? Please leave an honest review on your favorite site. That’s like the author discovering a gold nugget in the bottom of her washing machine.

Training my Dragon during NaNoWriMo

During NaNoWriMo, I trained my Dragon. I know you are thinking: “NaNoWriMo is supposed to be about writing words.” Silly you.

I got Dragon Naturally Speaking software a couple years ago. My husband knew I wanted to try speaking my writing. The next year, he bought me a new computer which had the Microsoft version of voice control, whatever it’s called.

To this day, I don’t use either of these tools.

Hey, it’s not my fault! I tried to train this silly Dragon, but not as regularly as I should have. I let it import my emails, my documents, and anything else it wanted in order to help it learn my writing style. Too bad it didn’t learn too much from that.

Several people recommended that I just read some of my writing to it. Because, yeah, I’ve got lots of time for recreational reading aloud. Don’t they know I’m supposed to be writing?

A few weeks ago, I saw this book titled 5000 Words per Hour. I thought the author must be crazy insane. But no, he had even managed 6000 words in an hour to add to his manuscript-all using Dragon software.

Okay, I write 1000 words per hour. I know this is a professional writer pace because I know professional writers who tell me that’s how much they write per hour. Shouldn’t I be happy with a thousand words per hour?

And then I remember that I have this awesome tool. The same tool Chris Fox, the amazing 6000 words per hour man, uses to do so much incredible writing. Shouldn’t I use this tool?

Obvious answer: yes.

So I decided to give it another try. That was on October 29. Yes the same October 29 that is exactly THREE days before National Novel Writing Month.

I must be insane. And why not? November, when I’m participating in NaNoWriMo, is all about insanity, isn’t it?

As soon as I got done with my Skype meeting with the amazing Chris Fox, I tried to use the Bluetooth headset that came with my Dragon Naturally Speaking. I never actually used it before, and apparently my computer did not recognize it.

So I pulled out my old Logitech headset and plugged it into the USB port. Aren’t Í cute?

And then I started talking. These are the words I said. Can you tell this by looking at them?

I think not.

While they were coming up on the screen, I felt so foolish. Shouldn’t I be typing? Isn’t that the way I get my words on the page?

While I speak, Dragon pad doesn’t tell me how many words I’ve spoken. I tend to think that I don’t know how long I’ve talked, but I could’ve typed it all faster.

dragonsRrealIn any case, I agreed with the masterful Chris Fox to give myself a goal every day during November and use Dragon.

Starting Monday, I will speak into this dictation box for ten minutes (slightly less time than it took me to speak this blog post). Then I’ll copy and paste my lovely words into Scrivener. And I’ll start the real writing (a.k.a. typing).

Depending on how well it goes, I will increase the number of minutes that I use Dragon every day. After all, I can’t get better if I don’t use it, right?

What’s your bet on this situation, reader? Will my Dragon be well-trained enough by the end of November that I can use him for my regular writing?

Maybe you already use Dragon. If so, give me your advice. It’s pretty apparent that I need it.

A New Library In Town: One Stop For Writers

If there’s one thing all writers agree on, it’s that writing is TOUGH. The road to publication twists and dips as we learn the craft, hone our abilities, create stories we’re passionate about, fight discouragement, educate ourselves about the industry…and then start the process all over again as we realize there’s room to improve. But you know what? If you are like me, you wouldn’t have it any other way.

Yet, sometimes it’s nice to get a helping hand.

Finding a good writing book, a helpful blog, a mentor or critique partner to share the journey with…these things are gems along the writing path.

And guess what? Maybe there’s another resource waiting just up the road called One Stop For Writers.


One Stop For Writers is not writing software, but rather a powerful online library that contains tools, unique description collections, helpful tutorials and much more, brought to you by Angela Ackerman & Becca Puglisi, the authors of The Emotion Thesaurus and Lee Powell, the creator of Scrivener for Windows.

Could One Stop For Writers be the writing partner you’ve been searching for? Visit Writers Helping Writers this week and see, where Angela, Lee and Becca are celebrating their venture with prizes and some pay-it-forward fun.

 

A Writer’s Life

If passion drives you, let reason hold the reins. – Benjamin Franklin

School is out. The vacation abroad has ended. Time announces the arrival of full-time writer-hood.

The schedule says: Three hours five days per week is allotted for writing. I’ve factored in other times for blog hopping and updating social media.

There’s a plan. *sighs*

I finished Plot and Structure, James Scott Bell’s masterpiece, and use it to guide my goal-setting and schedule for rewriting the novel.

Yes, rewriting. I doubt I will start anew, but I believe that a new document where I can cut and paste the sections I’m going to keep will work for me. Does this work in Scrivener? I guess I can make a new folder for the 2nd draft.

The book helped me generate plenty of questions that will need to be answered in my work in progress if it will ever become a completed novel.

No, I will finish the first draft by the deadline – August 24 – and I will begin the rewrite. This should take approximately eight weeks according to chapter 11 in Bell’s bible.

If I stay on schedule, I should be polishing the second draft in November. I hope this means I will be ready to take it to my classroom of 7th grade beta readers by January. At this point, that’s my plan.

During my cooling off period, I intend to work on building my social media platform (using the guidance of Kristen Lamb’s new book Rise of the Machines) and study Self-editing for Fiction Writers by Browne and King.

Bell has given me some other plotting homework that I intend to complete during my self-imposed exile to sit in the sunshine. For the next two months, this time is scheduled in for two hours every weekday afternoon. (You can be sure I’ll make time for the loving the sun – maybe meeting my word count for the day should be a prerequisite.)

What sort of schedule do you have for your writing life? Do you have a daily word count goal?

I’d love to hear any and all advice from my fellow writers – or other self-employed people.

                                       Weekly   Schedule

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
6AM Workout Workout Workout Workout Workout
7AM QT/BF QT/BF QT/BF QT/BF QT/BF BF
8AM Shower Shower Shower Shower Shower Shower
9AM Bathrooms Blogs Floors Ladies Social   Med Laundry
10AM Chore Meeting
11AM Writing List Writing Writing
Noon Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
1PM Writing Writing Writing Writing Writing
2PM Outdoors Outdoors Outdoors Outdoors Outdoors Family
3PM Outdoors Outdoors Outdoors Outdoors Outdoors
4PM Writing Writing Social   Med Writing Writing
5PM Dinner   Prep Dinner   Prep Dinner   Prep Dinner   Prep Dinner   Prep Dinner   Prep
6PM Family
7PM Time Writing
8PM Family