An Online Book Club

Book clubs should be for discussing books and recommending books. Can you do such a thing online? That’s what I intended to find out when I joined Reader’s Coffeehouse.

One of my goals for 2017 was to join a book club. I love to read, so why not turn it into an opportunity to socialize.

Because we author-types tend to be anti-social reclusive and introverted. But books are our thing.

How I Found It

There’s no science behind finding this group. In fact, it sort of found me.

My friends list on Facebook is a combination of family and friends I know personally AND a bunch of writers I’m networking with, most of whom I haven’t met in person.

Guess what’s true about most writers?

They like to read.

And it was one of these friends who suggested the group to me. I think all they did was share a post from the group. It appeared in my newsfeed and the rest…is social media connection.

However, I’ve found other writing and reading groups by searching for them on Facebook. I’d recommend a private group, and I’m not sure you can search them.

Maybe a Facebook expert will comment on this.

The Group Format

The group I’m a member of was founded by nine (women’s fiction) authors. They regularly host drawings for their books (paperback, audio and digital).

One of these authors lives in a city near me. I’ve met her in person, listened to her speak about her writing methods and talked to her about the publishing industry.

Until that transpired (at a local library), I hadn’t even heard of her. That night I bought a trade paperback of one of her novels.
And I was hooked.

She wasn’t my usual sort of author. Her stories didn’t have total resolution or even a happy ending. But the people were vividly real. And she made me laugh.

Each day, one of the founders posts a question on the group page to spark discussion. I rarely comment on these. However, I’ve connected with other readers on Goodreads because of one such post and managed to win a couple books.

Each month, there is a book to read that is discussed with the author on the last day of the month. The list for the year is posted in the group (but not exactly pinned, so I copied it onto my tablet).

I’ve read four of the six books. I’ve commented on the discussion of three of those four.

End Results

While I’ve enjoyed interacting with this group, it’s not the same as when I had a monthly live and in-person group to meet with.
The comments are directed to the author of the book, meaning there isn’t much actual discussion about the story or characters or setting. I’m sure these are more interesting to non-authors who are curious about the process behind the page.

I just want to talk about books. Did the story engage me? Did the characters inspire or irritate me? Would I recommend the book to others?
So…the conversation about books has fallen short of my expectations.

Has the group fulfilled my needs? Partly.

I’ve met new authors and readers. I’ve read books I probably wouldn’t have otherwise.

But it didn’t get me out of the house. And it certainly didn’t unhook me from the computer.*sigh*

There are rumors that a few of the members of my former book group are planning to reconnect in September. I hope and pray it is so.

Until then, I’ll keep scrolling through the recommendations and reading the monthly book. Hopefully, I’ll keep winning books, too.

Have you ever been in a book club? What makes it successful?

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I Want to be a Libriomancer

Books are magical. Reading transports you to a different place and time and introduces you to more people than you could ever hope to meet. That’s why I want to be a libriomancer.
You might be scratching your head, wondering what I’m talking about. If you’re a geek who knows some Latin, you might realize this has something to do with books and magic.

If you’re a fan of the Magic Ex Libris Series by Jim C. Hines, you know exactly what I’m talking about. (Still not sure, read my review of his earlier books in the series).

What is a Libriomancer?

Libriomancer-FullA libriomancer is a person who can draw magic from books.

I know, I think I’ve been one by that definition for most of my life. And I know C. S. Lewis was one because he transported me to Narnia via book dozens of times.

In Hines’ world, a libriomancer can access the magic inside a book to draw objects from the book.

You’d like an Invisibility Cloak? A libriomancer could grab one out of Harry Potter’s closet (if only those Harry Potter books weren’t locked. Don’t know what I’m talking about? Read Libriomancer, book one of the series).

The “librarian” who is the hero of the series is pulling Lucy’s bottle of healing potion out of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in every installment. Fighting evil is a dangerous business. Best to be prepared for the worst.

                                              How does this work?

People read books. The more people who read the book and suspend their disbelief to embrace the story, the more magic potential that waits inside a book.

There are limits. The object has to be small enough that it would fit through the covers of the book. I suggest huge hardbacks for working these spells, so you can make certain Excalibur makes it out of King Arthur’s hand intact.

The magician has an innate sense of magic. They must be able to fully picture the object they want to pull from the book in their mind. Small imaginations need not apply.

Why I Want to be One

I fit all the qualifications for libriomancy.

  • I read books.
  • I have a great imagination.
  • I can recall scenes with vivid detail that’s just crazy considering how many books I’ve read.
  • I have a desire to be innately connected to a magical continuum.

In fact, since I’ve been claiming books are magic portals for years, I should be at the front of the line for receiving the gift of libriomancy.
Also, I’m conscientious. I wouldn’t abuse my power.
What other qualities do I need?

Book-ReviewA Review of Revisionary

Recently, I joined a Facebook book club (more on that later—maybe). One of the founding authors for the group asked what the best book we’d read this year would be.

Revisionary by Jim C. Hines was at the top of my list.
Revisionary-199x300
Even though I didn’t give it five shiny stars (I found a few things a mite of a stretch), it was the book I wanted to read the most that didn’t disappoint me.

I love Isaac Vainio, and I was wondering how things were working out for him since the wider world discovered the existence of magic and magical creatures at the end of book three.

As you can imagine, governments are trying to regulate magic while also exploiting it for their own purposes.

Magical creatures are starting to unite against humans. Humans fear them, so they want them crowded onto reservations and registered like firearms. Since they aren’t human, they don’t have protection under the U.S. Constitution.

The political finagling in this book rivals spy novels.

And we know how much Isaac adores jumping through hoops and cutting through red tape.

Lots of action in this book to keep you turning pages. Plenty of clues and twists keep you guessing to the end whose the mastermind behind the plot behind the plot of the plotters.

Readers of fantasy will love this book. Yes, there is some foul language. However, other adult themes are kept to a minimum.

The Surprise

The most startling thing to me about reading this fourth book in this contemporary fantasy series was learned when I read the acknowledgements.

Most of the time I skim these things. I know! As an author, I should read them. I understand how it takes a village to get a book from the idea stage to a library shelf.

Still, I don’t know most of the people mentioned.

I also don’t know much of anything about most of my favorite authors. I’ve never been one of those people who joins fan clubs and follows every media account of a celebrity. Even one I like.

Color me shocked when I discovered Mr. Hines was not a full-time author.

Excuse me? He’s writing these amazing books at a rate of once per year or so and that’s not his JOB?

Well, it wasn’t his job. With four books in a successful series, Mr. Hines has now donned the cape of insanity. He joins the rest of us spending his days holed up in an office with imaginary friends.

I’m thrilled. I hope that means there will be more books in this series I dearly love.

And if he could grant me the power of libriomancy…all the better.

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What makes some people love to read?

love2readbooks

Considering the fact that I want more people to read my blog, I’m certain I don’t read enough other blogs and post comments as much as I should. This reciprocity is one of the best ways to get people to visit and comment on my blog. So they say.

There are a few blogs that I simply adore and I read them faithfully. I don’t always comment – unless they spark a thought in me that must be expressed. One such blog, written by Jami Gold, caused me to think deeply for several hours and days. Read it here.

In short, she discussed how she lost her love for reading because of the way the subject was addressed I school. Since I’ve heard similar things from my students, I know she’s not an anomaly. How can we address this very real problem in our society?

Not promoting a love for reading is only one of many problems in the public school system. In recent years, the press to interest students in math and science has overwhelmed the classroom, thanks to media attention. The truth is, a student won’t be able to access the information in any subject if they can’t read.

Arguably, the ability to read is not the same beast as the desire to read. They are the same species, though. If I want to read, I will learn to do it. If I can’t read, I certainly won’t have any interest in doing it.

Jami shared how a school system in her area asked all students to read or skim a list of books for their upcoming school year. At the beginning of the year, the students choose their four favorites from the eight or ten they read. During the year, they will analyze their chose books in small discussion groups with other students who also chose that book.

This is a great plan, in that it eliminates the aspect of being forced to read a book that holds no interest for you. Everyone responds better when they feel they participated in choosing their outcomes, as well. Small group discussions are an excellent way to discuss elements of literature like plot, theme, characterization and symbolism.

Every plan has drawbacks. The one I see in this case is that many students will NOT read or skim the books. When the time arrives for them to select their books, they’ll find out what their friends are choosing and pick that.

When the time for discussion comes, they may still not have read the book and will just be faking their way through in order to complete whatever the larger, graded assignment might be for the book.

I think back to what made me love reading. I learned to read before kindergarten, sitting beside my mom while my sister read her books from school aloud (she’s two years older). Mom loved reading and invested in library cards or us at an early age. One night every few weeks, we headed to the public library and picked out something to read.

The idea of NOT reading didn’t even occur to me. Reading was the social norm in my home. Even my non-communicative dad read a pile of Zane Grey westerns. While my husband’s family parked in front of the TV, we were in different chairs reading. It might have been nicer to be interacting socially (we did play tons of games but my dad’s volatile moods limited how often that would happen for the four of us).

What about today? I know that I can just look at my sister’s kids and my kids and draw a conclusion.

My sister Connie did the whole library card thing with her three children. The main reason for this was because she home-schooled them; thus the only access they had to a library was when she took them. All three of her kids enjoy reading and will read for pleasure. Sure, they love playing video games, too, but it isn’t an either/or decision. I’ve bought books for them on many occasions – at their request.

On the flip side, my boys are a 50/50 split. I read aloud to them when they were preschool-aged and until they became involved in too many other activities (my oldest was fourth or fifth grade). First, it was the Chronicles of Narnia and then the first three Harry Potter books. I let them choose, but most of the time they were happy to listen to whatever I chose for them.

We didn’t go to the public library. They brought home Scholastic book order forms and I purchased them what they wanted. My oldest son loved fantasy. My youngest son wanted the newest book of world records. Can you guess which one loves to read? Although he still has to be invested in the characters before he will choose it on his own. He has read five or six series and I’m trying to hook him up with some adult fantasy now.

Is the library the difference? I’m not so sure. I failed to mention that my sister didn’t have regular TV. They bought DVDs of series and movies, but the push toward prime time viewing didn’t exist in their home. My sons are not totally sold on watching TV either, but they do view things online.

I think the establishment of normal is the answer.

I’m not pointing fingers here, but my husband doesn’t read books. In our nearly 26 years together, I recall him reading exactly one fiction book: Jurassic Park. He reads manuals and texts to gain certification in his field. Since he teaches at church, he reads the Bible and commentaries.

Read for pleasure? He camps in front of the TV for his recreational entertainment. It’s not unusual to find us sitting together on the couch. I have my iPad and am reading a book on my Kindle app. He’s sprawled against the pillows flipping between a police show, some so-called sitcom or a car program.

In my sister’s case, all five of them spent time reading.

I know my scope of study is pretty limited. I think the shared genetics adds an interesting twist.

I read to escape. I still can go on a vicarious vacation through reading fiction. Perhaps my children have nothing to run away from and that’s why they don’t dive into books like I do.

I’m not a scientist. I am a writer. Writers need readers. This idea that reading fiction has no value deflates my career possibilities. Especially if teenagers buy into it since I’ve written a fantasy series with that age group in mind.

What’s your take on this subject? Do you think family pattern or school dictate in the case of liking or hating to read?