Tag: Essay

Analyzing Literature

circling sharks

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I’ve read a prize-winning novel, and now I have to analyze it for my Seminar in American Literature. My analysis should run six to eight pages in length.

What is making this paper so difficult to write? I have two answers for this question:

  • I didn’t like the book – I did like the writing and I was amazed by Egan’s ability to break so many rules and still win a Pulitzer. There was no struggle to keep reading because I kept thinking, “This is all going to make sense in the end.” Wrong! This is what I didn’t like about it. Sure, that made it gritty and realistic, but I expect more from a book. I can get all the bad news I want from the newspaper – or my classroom. A writer needs to deliver closure in some form, even if it isn’t a happy ending.
  • Focusing in on loss of innocence is depressing – It sure hasn’t added any happy moments to the past five weeks. Even without writing about the “failed” characters in my paper, I couldn’t offer much hope or cheer. Since my thesis states that every bad choice is redeemable and no dream is unreachable, I forced myself to narrow my view to those characters that were able to turn it around. Still, it’s not a happy picture.

Actually, I think my difficulty might be because there is no way to support my analysis. Since the book is so new, there aren’t any journal articles published that deal with it. I can find book reviews, but that’s not the same sort of analytical thinking that comprises those peer-reviewed journals.

I feel like I’m in the middle of the ocean, fully dependent upon an orange life jacket. Swallowing the sun, the horizon stretches for eternity. Somewhere below me, I’m sure the sharks are gathering.

In this scenario of sink or swim, it feels like swimming will zap all my energy, and the end result will be the same. Shark bait Slipping beneath the salty waves to sleep forever.

Wow, a paper that makes death look restful.

Elements of an Essay

Exhibit A - Death by Shakespeare
Exhibit A – Death by Shakespeare

My first essay for the Shakespeare class is due this weekend. Ho, hum. Couldn’t they come up with something more original?

If you’ve been in college for any length of time, you know that professors adore essays. Perhaps they’ve run out of reading material, so they assign an essay to while away their evening and weekend hours. Don’t they have a life? They sure know how to keep me from having one.

As much as professors love essays, students loathe them. I’m loath to admit it, but most of the time, I don’t mind writing an essay. I love to write. I’m pretty good at discerning facts and then synthesizing them and expounding on paper.

Sadly, writing about the first three plays I’ve read for my class this term ranks right up with going to the dentist for a filling. (I’m doing that today, by the way.) I have nothing positive to say about these plays.

As essays go, this one only has to be 800 to 1000 words. That’s a mere three pages. Since we’re required to cite two outside sources in the essay, it should be a simple matter to find enough to satisfy the requirements.

What Makes an Essay?

An essay needs four things: a thesis statement, supporting evidence, convincing argument and a satisfactory conclusion.

Wrapping all the important details into a neat package, the thesis statement is a thorough summation of the entire content of the essay. In a nutshell, my essay says…and that’s the thesis for the paper.

All the supporting evidence ties back to the thesis. Every example from the text being analyzed should support the stated thesis. It’s easy to pull things out of context, but if your professor knows the source, you’ll just be shooting yourself in the foot. Keep it in context.

Argue concisely and with clarity. Supporting statements from secondary sources written by experts are convincing arguments. Formulate your own analysis. Don’t just parrot what has already been published.

The best conclusions are those that tie up all the loose ends neatly. They never introduce new information. They refer back to any analogy used in the introduction. A satisfactory conclusion flows like water and reveals the strength of the thesis, like a beautiful bow on a professionally wrapped package.

Now, I guess I should get back to that essay on Cleopatra. Does anyone like this woman? She acts like a rich, spoiled queen and appears to have loyalty only to herself.